Thursday, July 28, 2011

Jet of the Day - JBowerEngraving



My name is Jennifer Bower and my Etsy shop is JBowerEngraving.  From the time I was a little girl I wanted to be an artist.  Crayons, markers, pencils, paints, I loved using anything I could get my hands on.  I took several art classes and explored several different kinds of art but it wasn't until I tried hand engraving that I found my true passion.
Hand Engraving is an art form that goes way back and can be found gracing the faces of watches, decorating the plates of antique clocks, enveloping someone's wedding band or telling a story on the block of an old printing press.  Today, many hand engravers specialize in the engraving of knives and firearms as jewelry tends to be more and more laser or machine engraved.  I had the opportunity to meet with a gifted hand engraver on a few occasions and received some pointers on how to get started. However, with no formal training, I'm still learning as I go and finding my own style.


When I have an idea for a piece I sit down with my sketch pad and a pencil.  I'll erase and redraw until I have what I think will be the perfect image to engrave.  I place the piece of metal I'll be working on in a rotating vice.  This allows the metal to stay completely fastened and stationary while I work.  I use a pencil or marker to draw an outline of the image I want to create onto the metal.  Then, I use a sharp tip, or scribe, to lightly outline the image permanently onto the metal.


When I first started I was working with the naked eye and realized I couldn't see my work surface as well as I had hoped.  I now use a lighted microscope to help magnify my work surface so it's easier for me to add detail to the images I'm engraving.  Once my microscope is focused on my outlined image, I take my engraver in hand and begin to work.

To aid in removing metal, I use an air powered hand piece.  Basically, I have a metal tube attached to a sharp blade and spring.  This metal tube (hand piece) is connected to other tubing and an air compressor.  The air compressor gently pulses air toward the blade so I can get a deeper cut in the metal.  Historically, many engravers worked by pushing the blades with their hands or "chasing" it with a hammer.  Those methods are still used and do work, but the assistance of air relieves physical strain and aids in more precise cuts. The air compressor's strength is controlled by valves and a foot pedal much like that of a sewing machine. 

As I cut the metal, it rolls off in perfect little coils, leaving behind beautiful, mirrored cuts in the metal. If the blade isn't properly sharpened, or the angle of the cut is not right, the metal will rip or gouge leaving very ugly, uneven, messy lines.  It requires a lot of concentration as well. I often find myself holding my breath or focusing on keeping my body very still because one miss-move and the piece is ruined. There is no erasing, no salvaging a gouge or misplaced line, you have to start all over again.


I'm very inspired by designs in architecture, art nouveau and art deco patterns, as well as fonts and lettering styles from many different time periods.  One such font is known as leaf script.  The letters of the alphabet are created using vines, leaves, swirls and flowers.  It's difficult to find complete alphabets to work off of so I've been creating my own.  The picture below shows a "B" in the leaf script I'm designing.


Currently my most popular pendants are those with initials and monograms on them.  I love knowing that these will be heirlooms one day.


The pendants I love creating the most are those with special designs and pictures. They take so much more time and concentration but, in the end, are truly unique.  One of my favorites is an engraving of a bee. I'm fascinated by nature and insects.  Normally I would move swiftly away from a bee but they are lovely in their own way.



What I like the most about what I do is that I can engrave nearly anything! It's all up to the imagination.
Thank you for reading.

15 comments :

Erika Price said...

Amazing work, Jennifer - it was fascinating to read about how you create your gorgeous pieces!

Crystal Impressions said...

Gorgeous Jennifer....fantastic article....very interesting to see how all those beautiful pieces are created...

Beadsme said...

Wow, awesome work.

Rough Magic Creations said...

Jennifer, your work is enchanting! Thank you so much for sharing your amazing techniques with all of us!

Autumn Bradley said...

Wow Jen! That's intense. I love reading about the techniques people use. Thanks for sharing. You do fabulous work!!!

Made By Tammy said...

Jennifer, Phenomenal art and jewelry! Truly amazing how your pendants are created.

Jessica @ AbellaBlue.com said...

I can't believe the detail you put into each piece. I can barely get a straight line with my graver. Thank you for sharing your technique, I love your work!

Tracy said...

Wonderful post! Thanks for sharing your work process. Its amazing the detail you are able to get! You are very talented!

Michele said...

A wonderful feature thanks so much for sharing, you're truly talented and creative!!!!

Jennifer said...

Fascinating! Thanks for sharing your process with all of us.

Ribasus said...

You have the patience of a saint! Lovely work and a great article.

Auntie R

cabbingrough said...

Beautiful, fascinating work Jennifer! Thanks for sharing it, I really enjoyed reading this.

Dashery Jewelry said...

Fascinating process! You make such beautiful designs!

SilverSmack said...

Very cool!

cooljewelrydesign said...

Very detailed and discerning work...it is an outstanding art form, and you have mastered it so well. LOVE your bee print also!!