Friday, March 9, 2012

Jet of the Day - Capital City Crafts

 
Legends and Lore of St. Patrick

Let's be honest.  People did not write much back in  400 AD. And if they did write something, the chance that it was preserved is slight. So there is much myth surronding the man who became known as St. Patrick.  Some of Patrick's writings did survive, but there are no dates mentioned.




Patrick was born in England or Scotland during the end of the 5th century. He was kidnapped as a youth and taken to Ireland as a slave.  His father was a deacon, his grandfather a priest. He wrote that he prayed daily during the six years he was held captive.  He had a vision and escaped to return home, later to become ordained as a bishop in the Catholic Church.  



 He soon had a second vision, calling him to return to Ireland and convert the pagans.  For about 20 years he pursued his quest, establishing monasteries, churches and schools , becoming a popular hero of the Irish.



Pious legend credits St. Patrick with banishing snakes from the island, chasing them into the sea after they assailed him during a 40-day fast he was undertaking.  Evidence suggests that Ireland never had snakes after the Ice Age.  So far, no serpent has successfully migrated across the open ocean to a new terrestrial home such as from Scotland on the neighboring island of Britain, where a few native species have lived. One interpretation of this myth is the snakes represent the Druids that Patrick was converting during his mission.  



Legends also credit St. Patrick with teaching the Irish about the  the Holy Trinity by showing people the shamrock, a three-leafed plant,  it's three lobes representing the Christian teaching of 'three divine persons in the one God.' For this reason, shamrocks have definitely become a central symbol for St Patrick’s Day.


It is thought that Patrick died in AD 461 on March 17, a date accepted by some modern historians.
This day has become a holy day in Ireland, and a day to celebrate the Irish  elsewhere. 


Recycled Silver Three Leaf Clover - Your Daily Jewels
Olive Green Jade Necklace with Sterling Silver - Trace Designs


 Green Aventurine Triskele Earrings - Sending Love Gallery
Emerald Green Antique Silver Filigree Recycled Ring - Malves 1009
Emerald Green Glass Brass Butterfly - Emotional Oasis

Green Jade Empress Earrings - Capital City Crafts


Thank you for reading,

17 comments :

Bob J24-7 said...

Cool post!

MadeByTammy said...

Great post! I never knew the legends behind St Patrick. Beautiful jewelry too!

Rough Magic Creations said...

What a beautifully written and informative post! I enjoyed every word, and the wonderful photos too!

Tracy said...

Awesome post! I love the lore!

Jennifer said...

What a fun read! And I adore those jade earrings.

SendingLoveGallery said...

enjoyed! here's to St.Patrick and pretty jewelry!

WanderingJewel said...

Great post, thank you for sharing some of the history behind St. Patrick.

nancy's crystal fantasies jewelry said...

Great information here. Lots of new insights into the history of St. Patrick's day. Very pretty jewelry, too.

Erika Price said...

Great article, Barbara, and beautiful jewelry too!

And thanks so much for sharing your knowledge - the English don't celebrate St Patrick's Day at all, so I've really learned a lot :)

TheSilverBear said...

What a great post - thanks Barb !

capitalcitycrafts said...

Thanks everyone for sharing my fun!

Michele said...

Very pretty, thanks for including my ring!!!! Intersting facts about St. Patrick.

Ali Abbas said...

i really loved to watch such an amazing collection

Anonymous said...

amazing collection

http://lifeblog79.blogspot.com/2012/03/jon-mclaughlin-at-his-best.html

jemsbyjb said...

Great info. I learned a lot of things I wasn't aware of.

ShinyAdornments said...

Look at all those great greens! One of my fave colors.

:-)

Kristy
SAStudio

cooljewelrydesign said...

I learned something about St. Patrick and also about the beauty of the Jet Team's take on green jewelry--a lovely find. Great post!